Attorney Blog

Turning legalese into legal-ease

Cell Phone Apps Can Be Used to Track a Cheating Spouse

July 31st, 2017

By: Amanda Vann, Esq.
301-563-6685
avann@a-f.net

Even though many people have suspicions that their spouses are having affairs, obtaining concrete proof of that is becoming easier with the onslaught of technology and the use of mobile apps. While Facebook, Instagram, and online dating websites are hugely popular because it is easy to get information, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of mobile apps to gather evidence of a cheating spouse.

Keep reading to learn more about how you can use apps to track a cheating spouse.
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Disturbing Trend: OPM’s Alleged Overpayments

July 30th, 2017

By Peter Casciano, Esq.
(301) 244-4523
pcasciano@a-f.net

We are seeing a disturbing trend in the Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM)  processing and adjudicating of alleged overpayment cases. For those who don’t know, from time to time OPM reviews the financial aspects of cases that are currently in pay status. It is possible, after winning federal disability retirement, and going into pay status, for OPM to revisit an annuitant’s case to determine whether OPM is paying the correct amount.

Keep reading to learn more about the trend in overpayment cases.

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The Impact of Parental Separation on Children

July 27th, 2017

In the United States, more than one million children each year are exposed to parental separation.[1] Research increasingly sheds light on both the short-term and long-term impacts of parental separation on involved children.

Keep reading to learn about the effects of a parental separation on children, and contact the family law attorneys at Andalman & Flynn for assistance with your separation, divorce, or child custody matter.

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Can I Use a Cell Phone or Other Electronic Device in Court?

July 27th, 2017

In a circuit court or a district court in Maryland, a person may bring and use an electronic device including a cell phone, a computer, a camera, and any other device that is capable of transmitting, receiving, or recording messages, images, sounds, data, or other information by electronic means. The use of such an electronic device is subject to inspection by court security personnel and is subject to some additional restrictions.

Keep reading to learn more about restrictions on using electronic devices in Maryland courts.

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Trevan v. OPM: How Is It Helpful to FERS Applicants Today?

July 18th, 2017

By Peter Casciano, Esq.
(301) 244-4523
pcasciano@a-f.net

Trevan v. Office of Personnel Management, 69 F.3d 520 (1995) is the federal appellate case describing the legal effect an SSA disability benefits award can have on a pending federal disability retirement case.

Keep reading to learn more about this important case and how it could affect your FERS claim.

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What Are Problem-Solving Courts?

July 6th, 2017

Problem-solving courts help the judicial system to respond to the needs of litigants by addressing underlying issues which result in litigants utilizing the court system. Whether using innovative approaches to address social problems, forming community collaborative partnerships, or coordinating outside services including treatment programs, the problem-solving courts are changing the ways that the system manages certain cases.

Problem-solving courts often serve specific targeted populations including offenders with mental illness, offenders with a substance addiction, first time offenders, veterans, and repeat offenders. In Maryland, the Office of Problem-Solving Courts for the Administrative Office of the Courts is responsible for overseeing the creation of problem-solving programs in the state.

Keep reading to learn more about problem-solving courts in Maryland.

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What You Should Know Before Co-Signing a Loan

June 29th, 2017

By: Mary Ellen Flynn, Esq.
301-563-6685
Email: meflynn@a-f.net

mary-ellen-flynn

Banks, landlords, finance companies and other creditors often require potential borrowers to find someone suitable to be a co-signer of a loan before granting a loan of borrowed money or providing a lower interest rate. Examples of when a co-signer may be required include:

  • Students applying for student loans,
  • Young adults renting a residence or buying a car,
  • Adults of any age who need a loan but don’t have a good credit history.

Co-signing a loan can result in very serious legal and financial consequences for you. Keep reading to learn more.

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Three New Laws Impacting Maryland Estates in 2017

June 15th, 2017

By: Kate McDonough, Esquire
301-563-6685
kmcdonough@a-f.net

Divorce Lawyer in Maryland, Divorce Attorney, Andalman & Flynn

There were a variety of new laws or amendments to existing laws which will take effect this year that will have an impact on Maryland estate administration. This blog highlights three of the changes that estate Personal Representatives, attorneys, and all residents of Maryland should be aware of.

Keep reading to learn about these new regulations and how they might affect you!

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Service Dogs and Disability Benefits

June 14th, 2017

By Peter Casciano, Esq.
(301) 244-4523
pcasciano@a-f.net

As a life-long lover of dogs, sometimes the hardest part of my day is not petting the service dogs that occasionally accompany my clients to meetings with me. I learned early on that those sweet dogs are there for work, not play, and therefore it helps them do their job better if I don’t distract them. It is tempting though.

For many years, service dogs were thought of by society as “seeing-eye dogs” assisting those with vision impairment and/or loss. However, dogs provide assistance to people with disabilities across a wide spectrum.

Keep reading to learn more about service animals and how having one can affect your disability benefits claims.

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Does My Child Have a Say in a Custody Dispute?

June 6th, 2017

By: Amanda Vann, Esq.
301-563-6685
avann@a-f.net

One of the most common questions I am asked when addressing custody is whether or not a child will have the ability to express their wishes to the judge during the process. By the time a custody case is being filed in court, it is apparent that the parents are not in agreement regarding custody or a visitation schedule. The parents are asking for a judge to create an order deciding where the child should live and how often the child will see each of his or her parents, and many factors go into the judge’s decision.

Keep reading to learn more about how a child’s preference can affect child custody decisions in the state of Maryland.

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